Re: Where does 'gyrda' come from?

From: Grimmund <grimmund_at_EuuIe30vzahabTOqUSNB3vTF4OrWVBbNSXpUewRJ8PP9HrvN1JbZdGFRnTxcUbIvU4F>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2008 10:52:42 -0500


You're welcome. Apparently I was having a stupid attack. Ash is the conjoined AE character, not one of the /th/ characters.

What I called "ash" in a fit of old-timers, is thorn.

http://acunix.wheatonma.edu/mdrout/GrammarBook2007/ch2.html

My bad. :(

So, yes, sing "Eth, ash, and thorn". :)

Or

Grimmund

On Wed, Jul 23, 2008 at 8:33 AM, Alison Place <alison_place_at_NbTon9U7dzR1FYgPOvW_h-cIe4uBNLxLjJyWZrFVsaWivaz93fsR5YzRx7MZylpk3zGwRu9tw5QYWx_H-o2avZA.yahoo.invalid> wrote:
> Thanks, Grimmund! I could remember the letter 'thorn' (which I can't seem to
> import from my symbols list - it's actually the one that ends up looking
> like a 'y', but started off more like a 'p'), but not the name for
> 'eth'/'ash'.
>
> Finally got around to checking out the old characters, and was amused to see
> that the medieval scribes got completely confused themselves about whether
> they wanted to use thorns, ashes, 'y's or wynns (something that also used to
> look like a 'p', but was a 'w' sound). Eventually they chucked them all, and
> just used 'th' for all the 'th' sounds.
>
> Anyway, thanks for the clarification. Ash and thorn - should be able to
> remember them. In fact, can't seem to get "Oak and ash and thorn" out of my
> head, now!
> http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiOAKASHTH.html
>
> Alison
>
> ------------------------
>
> On Tue, 7/22/08, Grimmund <grimmund_at_oFc2HAJDKxXM2bdB7mklnJufBQF9eCU9-NLOWMrkfkJ4cK4h91csJWLFUS1nfnlgz3_6XnMCbkFILU4.yahoo.invalid> wrote:
> Small correction, probably way late in the game.
>
> That little funny looking d character -> is an eth, pronounced /th/.
>
> The related Old English character is an ash, looks something like a crooked
> y, the source of all those "ye old shoppe" signs, which were originally an
> ash, and mistaken by moderns as a y. Both are sometimes voiced and sometimes
> voiceless, and seem to be used interchangeable, at least in Old English.
>
>> > 'fem. gyja = goddess and priestess'
>> gythja
>
>> > (Like goi is both god and priest)
>> gothi

-- 
Thegn Grimmund Blackwing, OP, Windhaven, Northshield
Dan Long, Appleton/Oshkosh/New London/Green Bay, WI
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